MB: living and writing the early days of parks canada

MB Williams to her family, Nov 1933

Transcription / Additional Information

2 Golders etc. Nov. 29

My Dear family,

            Just got your jolly letters (Ruth’s & Mothers) written on the 20th. Only 9 days pretty good, Eh what? Think it must be Mother’s frivolous spirit that made the letter so light, it just blew over. She is just getting to be the liveliest member of the family and as for this match-making. I can only wish she had been as enterprising about 40 years ago and then her eldest daughter would not have been withering on the spinster stem. However, better late than never. But look here, before any really serious decision is reached

[pagebreak]

I should like to see a photograph of the young man & a specimen of his handwriting (if possible on a cheque) & an impression of his palm. A private view of his bank book by Mother might also be a good thing but no doubt she will attend to that without waiting for the suggestion. Please describe much more fully in next letter. This is exciting. I think I shall have to go to the Thieves Market & begin collecting spoons.

            You do sound horribly wintry & the letters arriving from Ottawa are a positive wail. Snow by the feet & ‘orribly cold!! Are we sorry we are here? I forbear to harrow your feelings by mentioning

[pagebreak]

that I am writing now with two windows open - It is true the gas fire is burning but chrysanthemums & even roses are blooming in the garden next door. Yet they say this is wintry weather & about as cold as they get it. It dropped to 32⁰ (above) the other night & everyone talked about it. Still I admit I have bought a woollie shirt. I know Mother will approve of that - & I never seem to have too many clothes on. If it is windy or foggy, you could wear three blankets & still “feel it.” Lots of sunshine & very little rain, so we are just lucky. Last year was lovely at home.

[pagebreak]

My life is uneventful. My companions go down town to French lessons & shoppings but after one attempt at the latter in which I did not distinguish myself for either speed or endurance, I was ordered to “stay put.” Nobody will take me so I have to remain peacefully at home and I think your Christmas box is going to be a very thin one. The crowds & rush really are terrible & I think I shall wait till later on to find you what I want. By the way the Jan. sales will be on in a month. Does anybody want material for a dress from Liberty’s – silk, satin, calico velvet wool, linen & what colour & how many yards. Silk probably about 5 shillings a yard, cotton about 2 shillings - plain or printed. (Hand blocked) Wuffie says the fire is too hot he has come over to lie under my couch.

[pagebreak]

He gave us a bad fright the other night. We had roast pheasants for dinner (awfully good) & Dora, the maid having been specially ordered not to, gave Wuff a bit. Now pheasants have the most diabolical little bones as sharp as glass & as hard & Wuff got one in his throat. He coughed a bit before bed time but not seriously but in the middle of the night we wakened to hear him gagging & choking. His “grandmother” & I (Auntie Mabel) brought him into our room & he would have choked himself black in the face of he hadn’t been black all ready, then just as we were deciding to wake the family & have him taken to a vet, he had a coughing spell & seemed easier & we sank back in our pillows feeling like parents with a child with the croup. Soon it became clear he had either coughed it up or swallowed it & if the latter, the question was, would it stick into his lungs &

[pagebreak]

make a hole. A dog Dora knew “had swallowed a rabbit bone & bled to death.” Horrid thought! You can imagine all the loving & petting Wuff got & he thoroughly enjoyed it. However nothing happened for we think he probably coughed it up like a sensible dog. Just now he is burying his hair brush under the rug & pretending it’s a rat.

            Letter from Cyril Inderwick saying he is sailing this week. His book is in the hands of N.Y. pub. Long letter from B. saying [hus] is coming over. She sounds very bright & well but says the family is broke as usual. I am sending her a cheque & some little things for the girls.

            Will write to Rufus next time. Love to Bobbie

                Toujours amour

                    Tante

Nice letter from E.

Metadata

Collection

Citation

M.B. Williams, “MB Williams to her family, Nov 1933,” MB: Living and Writing the Early Years of Parks Canada, accessed September 24, 2017, http://mbwilliams.academic-news.org/items/show/23.

Files

Click on an image to enlarge or to download a file. Audio files, if available, can be found above (right click to save).